Report of the Coarse wool Task Force

REPORT OF THE  COARSE  WOOL TASK FORCE  TEAM ON VISIT TO LOKHIT  PASHU PALAK SANSTHA RAJASTHAN

(1ST MARCH – 6TH MARCH 2009)

Bhanwarlal-Raika-and-his-camel-herd

TEAM MEMBERS

  • Dr Kamal Kishore
  • Mr. Gopi
  • Mr A K Pokharna
  • Anurag Rana

 

Itinerary for the initial survey:

 

1st March       – Udaipur, Sadri, Heerawar Village (Sadri), Ranakpur

2nd MARCH   – Jojawar (Anjgi dhani ), Mundara

3rd MARCH   -Jasole, Tharpakar Research Centre, Jaisalmer

4th MARCH   – Khetoli, Chacha, Phokan (URMUL), Chandni

5th March       – Kabir basti, Sam, Leather wool merchant

 

Introduction

 

The rural economy of Rajasthan has traditionally been based on livestock. Livestock includes sheep, cattle, goat, buffalo, camel and donkey. According to the livestock census of 1997, 70% of India’s camel population can be found in Rajasthan, these camels are an important means of transportation and important draught animals. Raikas own more than 90% of the camels in the area where less then 10% of these Raika families own camels.

According to a large number of historical references, the traditional occupation of Rajasthan’s Raika community was to take care of the camel breeding herds (tolas) belonging to the Maharajahs and other nobility. When the royal camel establishments were dissolved in the first half of this century, many of the camels passed into ownership of the Raikas who switched to producing camels for the emerging market in draught animals.

 

Lately the camel market for draught camels has been depressed and the severe decrease in grazing areas has turned camel production into a losing venture (Köhler-Rollefson, 1999).

Shearing

Shearing of camel wool is done once in a year before Holi (February and March) as a group activity by ordinary handheld scissors. The kid camel wool that is finest is kept separate. The wool from neck and back is coarse and is segregated from midsidethat is finer. The wool from hump is not shorn and the wool from legs, belly, face etc. is rejected

Wool Colours

At the time of shearing colored parts of the camel wool are separated in the following colour grades:

  1. Peeli (yellow),
  2. Dhoi (white),
  3. Kali (Black) and
  4. Kashi (mixed colors).

 

Wool Yield

1 to1.5 kg per camel per year

Sadari Camels

Mostly sold when young at Pushkar (Ajmer) animal fair.

Jaisalmer Camels

These camels are sold when slightly older. They roam independently of the owners.-They are collected for shearing and marking once in a year. The camel wool of Jaisalmeri camel is finer as compared to those from Pali and other areas.

Fibre Length

50 to 7o mm.Undercoat is soft and fine and outer coat is long and coarse.

Utilization of Camel wool

Camel wool is usde by the Camel rearers themselves. There is no organized market for it as the quantity available is very small.

 

Traditionally the products made for local use are Bhakals and Kamblies. The carding is mostly done by hand.The spinning has traditionally been done on drop spindles. The spun yarn is given to Jatiyas, Kumhars who are the traditional weavers and weave Bhakals and Kamblies. The weight of Bhakals varies fro 4 to 12 kg and there is wide variation in weight as well as size.Coarse camel wools is also twisted into cords to make ropes.

The camel population is gradually declining and hence the availability of camel wool is very little.

The camel wool of Jaisalmeri camel is finer as compared to those from Pali and other areas and traditionally utilized in making Ropes, Bags, Bhakals and Kamblies etc.

The team visited several places to have first hand knowledge about the various aspects of livestock mainly sheep and camel. A brief account is described here:

 

Raikas – A brief introduction

 

Raika agro-pastoralists are one of the largest, migrant groups in India. Various estimations place their population at around half a million people.Within Rajasthan, Raikas dwell primarily in the drier western districts of Jaisalmer, Barmer, Jodhpur, Jalore, Pali and Nagaur. Depending on their access to water and fodder, the amount of cultivable land they possess, the size of their flocks, and the composition of their households, Raikas may migrate for anywhere between three to twelvemonths a year (Agrawal, 1999).

While in the minds of many people, the Raikas are still mostly associated with camel

breeding, it is actually only a minority that is active in this occupation. The majority are now specialized sheep breeders

 

 

 

Heerawa (Nr. Sadri)

 

A Raika village where sheep and goat are reared. The villagers are making efforts to obtain better body weight for lambs so as to realize better price for surplus animals to be sold. They crossbred them without regard to the quality or quantity of wool.

 

Shearing is done three times a year in the months of October, January and June. The prevailing shearing charges were Rs.3 per sheep. The wool is sold on per sheep basis and the rate was Rs 5.00 per sheep which translate into approx Rs.20.00 /kg at the shearing point( assuming the yield of 400 gms per animal)

 

 

 

Ranakpur

 

There were several showrooms here displaying looms with products on the main Sadari-Ranakpur road. The weavers were from Jasol District, Barmer. They make products using cotton as warp and wool/goat hair, camel wool yarn or their combination as weft.

 

Jojawar

 

This is a village almost exclusively inhabited by camel rearers. Their income generation is by selling surplus animals .Buffaloes are kept for the purpose of milk where the yield is  6 to 8 liters per buffalo.

Camel milk is mostly consumed at home -no ghee /curd from this milk. The animals are sent to graze in the morning and come back in the evening. Major grazing is in nearby Kumbalgarh sanctuary (where there is obvious conflict with forest authorities) As a result camel numbers are down drastically.

The taste of camel milk is slightly saltier in Sadri as compared to Jaiselmer where it is sweeter and tastier. Some of the wool is held back and carded on linckerin machines and handspun on drop spindles. Weaving is done annually by weavers (meghwals) who come from Jodhpur area and weave for all the camel and sheep rearers (this tradition is also declining) . Mostly blankets/durries are woven and made in plain/stripes/checks. The Raika (mudra) make the bags (called pavaris).which essentially are used for carrying a vessel which is used for milking the camel. Some interesting handmade pouches are made for carrying tobacco and other misc. tools. The finishing of blankets (edges) is done by the Raika themselves. Milling of blankets is also practiced which is done with the help of methi and mustard oil.  It takes about  two days to weave a carpet and where they charge Rs. 1500. Felting of kid camel hair is also done.

 

 Jasol

 

This area has approx. 500 families that are involved where goat hair is used to make ropes.  Interesting and innovative tools are used for spinning  different colors of goat hair and subsequently twisting two into a thick rope .The ropes are sold all over north India for camel and cattle .The finer yarn is woven into tatpati (Jattpati) which is basically 2 feet wide to 100 feet in length and is used for sitting. The handmade products were exported till recently to the middle-east countries. The traders have now mechanized the whole system and setup the factories near the ports in Gujarat rendering a large no. of people jobless.

 

 JAISALMER

 

Tharparkar cattle station

 

 A very fine herd of cattle of Tharparkar was seen. Good animals with high yields and a good fat percent and resistant to disease which can withstand the hot and harsh climate of the arid region and needs to be promoted in the area where water is available.

 

Khetol 

 

There were about 200 households, majority Vishnois and some Meghwals. The camel population was approx 700. There were several products made from camel wool like durries, one weighing almost 17Kg, Bhakli (kambli), warp-cotton, weft-wool

The people here were mostly dependent on camels. There was a difference in camels from that of Sadri area.  They were ready to invest to form a cooperative for camel milk sale which could also sell camel wool. The camels here were dying of disease or old age. They were not skinned were usually left to rot in the desert (changing attitudes of the tradition communities (khatiks) towards this practice was sighted as the main reason.

 

Chacha

 

A Meghwal village and working in association with Urmul – a popular Ngo in the area

 

Pokhran

 

Urmul outlet and work shed, organized for weaving, dyeing and stitching. Ready to collaborate if initiative is taken by some interested group.

 

Chandini

Chenija community rearing camels have sizable camel population .They are willing to participate in any new program. The are excellent in making rali (Five different types, with distinct names).They use camel and goat hair to make bags for self consuption.

 

Kabir Ki Basti

 

A model village showcased by GOI. This is a weaver’s village cooperative under Khadi scheme that has been redundant as no work is available. There are excellent weaving possibilities as there are 8 peddles looms available with skilled weavers who can weave intricate patterns. The village needs work for both weavers and women who specialize in hand spinning.(The Indira Gandhi canal has reached some of the areas near the village which has created an alternative livelihood option and weaned away quite a lot of weavers however the water reaching the tail end is  very erratic which creates uncertainty).

 

Sam

This is a typical sandy desert and gives the camel owners the maximum employment due to the heavy rush of tourist during winter months Range of camel decorative products was seen with the camel owners.

 

Wool wholesaler (Jaislmer)

 

Here the situation was dismal – the wool collection apparently is reducing every year thereby suggesting a reduction in the sheep population. The price of wool is also declining. Substantial quantities of imported wool are available. The alarming fact was that if no local wool was available the wool industry would not be affected.

No camel wool has been ever purchased by this dealer – he is the largest procurer of wool in this district.

 

Khadi Institutions at Jaisalmer

 

No products were on display for sale prepared from either Camel Wool or local Sheep Wool.

However a range of products made from imported Merino wool were available.

 

Local market:

No camel wool products were available here while several signboards claiming to sell camel leather were seen. On closer examination it was found that all of these were made from sheep/goat leather and were being passed off as camel leather.

 

Jodhpur

 

In this place the only Khatik was located who was still practicing leather finishing by traditional techniques and will be the last of the generation since the children do not wish to continue with the practice.

 

 

Conclusion

 

The extensive visit to small camel breeding villages of Rajasthan were an eye opener. It was apparent by the end of the tour that the use of camel wool is diminishing very fast as are the traditional skill sets used for processing the wool.

 

There was very little awareness for healthy camel breeding practices while the preference of breeding sheep over camel was apparent amongst most villagers. The process of shearing, cleaning, carding and spinning was age old and no new techniques had been adapted or introduced since several decades.

 

Little efforts are being made to continue the tradition of hand crafting exquisite pieces of textiles from the wool. The tradition of camel belt making or jat patti weaving is still carried on by few only as a matter of livelihood. There is no survey to tell how many exact families that are rearing camels and making camel wool products in 2009 as the last survey was done only in1997. The change in their livelihoods would surely be drastic if not alarming. It is an obvious need of the hour to take stock and sustain some of the traditions of camel breeding. Its now not only a matter of sustenance but also for the sake of continuity to introduce new tools and technology and help the camel rearers of Rajasthan.

 

 

Scope of work

 

 

Rajasthan is the heartland of traditional crafts. Each district has a distinct textile tradition that is community based. The use of wool for making various textiles has been seen n most areas of western Rajasthan.

The following can be done for camel wool utilization

  1. Procuring camel wool
    1. Identifying correct seasons for shearing and introducing new tools
    2. Washing of wool – time and process
    3. Carding methodology
    4. Spinning – -reviving traditional spinning
  2. Utilizing wool according to different yarn qualities
  3. Craft survey of each area
  4. reviving traditional techniques
  5. workshops and trainings to understand scope of product development
  6. Identifying specific centers for product development and training
  7. Understanding production with the help of established NGO’s like URMUL.
  8. Marketing

PROPOSALS  / RECCOMENDATIONS  OF THE TASK FORCE TEAM FORCAMEL    HERDERS SUSTAINABLE LIVLIHOOD DEVELOPMENT   PROJECT

 

 

The Task Force’s  team  on Coarse Wool   were  invited   by  the  LOKHIT  PASHU PALAK SANSTHA    to advise and  support them in evolving  a  Sustainable Livelihood  strategy for camel  herders  in Rajasthan . The   task force  team  Mr. Kamal Kishore  Mr. Gopi Krishna  &  Mr A K Pokharna    visited   RAJASTHAN during  1ST – 6TH MARCH 2009   .Field visits to  , Heerawar Village (Sadri), and Ranakpur around  Sadri ,Jojawar (Anjgi dhani ), near Mundara,and  Khetol , Chandini &Sam in Jaislmer   were  made to  understand  the traditional   value  chain  in  production  and marketing  of  Camel bye –products namely   Camel wool/hair  and hide market  in Rajasthan. The  team  interacted   with  camel herder, Shearers  of camel wool, Tanners , Spinners, Weavers,  Accessiory  braiders , Wool & Hide  traders  and  NGOs    in the  area to  explore the potentials of  value addition to camel  wool & Hide;

 

SHEARING  SORTING & GRADING  OF CAMEL WOOL

 

The  taskforce team  visited Heerawar  near Sadri and  Jojawar (Anjgi dhani ),  in  Mundara   to understand   the camel  herding  system of Raikas  and  observe    the shearing of camels  in Jojwar , The team  looked  into  Shearing practices in the area and  noted  following

 

Shearing of camel wool is done once in a year before Holi (February and March) as a group activity  involving both men & women .  Considering  the shortage of water in the area the animal are not washed  prior to Shearing , Cutting is done by  men with  ordinary handheld scissors. The women  sort the wool  , kid camel wool that is finest is kept separate from  adult camel wool. The wool from neck and back is coarse and is segregated from midside that is finer. The fibres are in the  range of  25 -45 microns. Undercoat is soft and fine and outer coat is long and coarse. The wool from hump is not shorn and the wool from legs, belly, face etc. is rejected  .

At the time of shearing colored parts of the camel wool are separated in the following color grades: Peeli (yellow), Dhoi (white), Kali (Black) and  Kashi (mixed colors).

 

The Wool Yield from  camels of this region  is in the  range  of  700 gms to1.5 kg per camel per year. The analysis of hair quality attributes of Jaisalmeri camels  by(Bhakat et al., 2001) indicated a 6.16±0.24 cm staple length, 35.52±0.59 hair diameter and the percentage composition of different types of hair was revealed to be 36.31±0.71% pure, 38.41±0.60% hetero, 36.31±0.71% hairy and 1.25±0.18% kemp fibres .

 

 

According  Dr.Patni ( Central Sheep & Wool Research Institutes –Avikanagar) the  Results of fibre testing of camel wool are given as follows

Fibre categories Fineness (microns) Medullation (%) Length (mm)
Brown 30.8 63 33
Dark brown 39.3 71 43
Black 45.2 73 65

 

The team  has collected 15 kg of camel wool samples   from the region and assigned the task of anyalsis  to  BHTTICO -Kullu  for grading  & spinning into different counts to develop sample products

 

The team  observed   that  the Undercoat  wool which is soft and fine with unique characteristics of conductivity, softness and strength is of high commercial value this accounts for 20 to 30 % of the harvested wool  .  The  fine  undercoat  camel wool  which is in range of  18 -19  microns among  the jaislmer camels,  and 20-21 microns  in Sadri  area   can fetch 400 -500 per kg /wool,commercial interests are seeking to purchase the wool for use in the world’s high fashion industry ,Value addition of  such wool into fashion  accessories such as Stoles, Scarf’s, Jackets, Caps can fetch about Rs 6000-1000 per kg. Similarly  sorting  and grading  can done for the  Coarse Wool can also fetch remunerative prices and  employment of women in processing of  wool.

LPPs should make interventions  at this stage of  shearing  for harvesting  wool ,sort  and grade the camel wool  according   to   Color/Age/Staple length/ microns for getting remunerative prices.

 

Also  intervention should explore  various ways of shearing the camel wool and segregation of undercoat either manually or mechanically.

 

 

The  grading  & sorting  of wool is in  four colors, if they also sort them in 6-7 colors including brown & dark brown tones , they can have good range  for  natural designs.

 

 

The interventions required are ,

Enumeration/Survey of Traditional Shearers & Sorters

 

CAPCITY BUILDING

 

 

Capacity Building  of  Traditional  Shearers

3 days program (Field Based)

Up-grading Skills in Shearing,

Use of Improved Tools

Washing of Animals

Sorting&Grading                                                                        Processing & Storage

Training of Youth (Men/Women)

One week program

Imparting Skills in Shearing,                                                                       Use of Improved Tools                                                                        Sorting & Grading                                                                        Washing of Camels                                                                         Processing & Storage                                                                         Spinning

 

 

 

 

 

Taking  the CAMEL  POPULATION  – 2009 –  373,000 CAMELS  The availability of  wool @ rate of 700 gms per animal the total wool availability  is 261. 1 ton per anum

 

Shearing of  Camel wool  – 10 animals per day/per shearer- 37,300 person days – 1250 persons  can employed over a month during the shearing season

 

Sorting & Grading  manually – a women can sort and grade – 8 kgs per day , It requires 32638 person days  for this exercise -1087  women can be employed during the shearing season.

 

The estimated  over all  demand  based on the above figures  is for about  1200 persons for  this activity, assuming 70%  of  the camels are in Rajasthan the requirement would be  840 persons. Our guestimate  on the traditional shearers for the state is around 340,

 

The project can target about  training of  – 340 traditional shearers  and  500 Training of Youth (Men/Women)  in this activity.

 

Since the activity is seasonal, the women /men who are trained should also be trained  in  Spinning or Value addition, so the women/men are gainfully employed all around the year

 

 

 

  • The project should explore various ways of shearing the camel wool and segregation of undercoat either manually or mechanically.

 

Scouring ,Carding, Spinning.,  & Twisting

 

Scouring

In the area  there is no practice of scouring wool, wool is washed to remove  removal of vegetable matter and associated dust, when soaked the light vegetable matter floats on the water surface which removed by hand. Since the grease content in camel hair is below 1%,  chemical scouring is not needed;

Carding

In  Jojawar village   the  herders are carding  the camel wool on  linckerin/willow  machines  for  opening the raw wool, prior to  carding  the wool  is mixed thoroughly and an emulsion of oil and water is sprinkled over it uniformly. It is again opened by willow machine and left over night so that the material may absorb desired moisture to help the carding process   , we were informed that  hand carders  were being employed in most of the villages

SPINNING

Spinning of  camel  wool  is being done on drop spindles  by  both men and women and  on  traditional wooden  Charkas  by women. The charge for   spinning  Coarse yarn  for carpets  is around  Rs.15 – Rs 20  per kg  and for spinning  fine yarns  used in blankets  is around  Rs . 40  – 50 per kg. The herders families themselves  spin the yarn  and  given to Jatiyas, Kumhars who are the traditional weavers for weaving Bhakals and Kamblies for their personal  use, the surplus  yarn is sold to these weavers , or weavers buy wool and give to the spinners of  getting  spun yarn.

Twisting  of ropes

The  coarse camel wool  spun in the area is used  for twisting  ropes  which are used for  tying  animals Making  decorative  rope accessories,  the  yarn  is  twisted   by hand and on simple twisting machines, The task force team  visited  Jasol were  approx. 500 families  are involved in  goat hair is used to make ropes.  Interesting and innovative tools are used for spinning  different colors of goat hair and subsequently twisting two into a thick rope .The ropes are sold all over north India for camel and cattle The finer yarn is woven into tatpati (Jattpati) which is basically 2 feet wide to 100 feet in length and is used for sitting. The handmade products were exported till recently to the middle-east countries. Jasole craftsmen have evolved cottage scale  simple  and  cost effective technologies  in twisting  ropes which is   very valuable to  camel  herders  in scaling up production of  camel wool yarn and ropes  if  they get into export  market segment .

The task  force team  has found  immense knowledge  of  processing ,  spinning  , & value addition of   all  kind  of   fibres   in different  counts from finest to coarse  with  simple technologies   in the  villages among  the communites  inhabiting   the  region .

 

 

The  interventions  in Processing   camel wool  -Scouring ,Carding, Spinning.,  & Twisting are required  by  LPPS  in strengthening  the  camel  wool  value addition  livelihoods in the  villages  would  involve

 

  • Extension of Coarse wool technologies
  • Diffusion of  traditional knowledge of Coarse fiber  harvesting, processing and value addition know-how  camel herders
  • Capacity Building  -Skill upgradation  of  Camel herders & associated communites  in   fiber  harvesting, processing and value addition
  • Piloting, Technology & Product design  &  development,
  • Strengthening & Developing   domestic & export market  linkages for value added camel by products
  • Accompany & escort the herding communities in  identifying & strengthening  social entrepreneurs promoting  Camel bye-product based livlihoods
  • Introducing appropriate /cost effective  cottage  scale  coarse wool  technologies  adopted in  sheep/ goat/alpaca / etc  among  the  camel  herders in areas of    Scouring ,( bio scouring  of  camel  wool )  Carding with  Holland  hand carders, Spinning on  improved  pedal charkas  & Twisting on improved twisting  machines –

 

The   critical interventions of LPPS required on priority  for the , CAMEL HERDERS  SUSTAINABLE  LIVLIHOOD DEVELOPMENT   PROJECT would be

 

  • Enumeration/Survey of Traditional processers/ carders/spinners in the area  and  their coverage and capacity

 

  • Run spin ability trails both of inner and outer coats of camel wool by both machine and hand spinning

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Capacity Building  of  Women  in Spinning/Carding

 

Traditional processers/ carders /spinners Up-grading Skills in , processing/carding/spinning

 

One month program (Field Based) Use of  traditional Tools & technologies –                                                                                         carders Manual/Mechanical

 

Establishment  of  CFC

Common Facility Centers

Identification of  clusters  for establishing

CFCs for processing/ carding

 

Training of Youth (Men/Women)

One Month Program

 

Imparting  Skills in, processing/carding/spinning

Use of Improved Tools –  Holland carders Medleri  & Amber Charkas

 

Training of Youth (Men/Women)

One Month Program

Imparting  Skills in, Twisting of Ropes & Yarn

Use of Improved Tools –  Rope twisters/ Medleri  Charka

 

 

 

 

Taking  the CAMEL  POPULATION  – 2009 –  373,000 CAMELS  The availability of  wool @ rate of 700 gms per animal the total wool availability  is 261. 1 ton per anum

 

1-2%   loss during scouring, 2% Kemp fibres , 25% short fibres  – About 30% of the camel wool about  78.33 is   not available  for spinning, 20% is of the wool is undercoat – ie  36.54  tons

 

About 146 tonnes  is available   for spinning,  the  daily output  on  these technologies are as  follows

DROP SPINDLE spinning – 1 kg per day

Tradational  Charka       @ 1.5KG PER DAY

SPINNING IN MEDLERI CHARKAS @ 2KG PER DAY

Amber Charka  –  4 Kgs  per  day

In the dropspindle  spinning  segment  there  is need  for  240 spinners

The drop spindle spinners can  spin the  fine undercoat  they can spin about 3 Quintals of wool per person/per annum or 1.5 quintals  for   6  months around 240 members  or 12 SHGs can be  gainfully employed in this segment, who can be spinners  and felters who work on felting of  unspunable/ short fibers. The  project  after upgrading  the 240 traditional  dropspindle  spinners  in felting,

For every 2 dropspindle  spinners we need 4 medleri  charka spinners, the requirement of such spinners for spinning 146.3 tones would  be require 73000 person days, around 120 women in medleri charka and 60 women can trained in Multi spindle Amber charka who spin all round the year

A  total no of  420 members or  22 self help groups   – 240  tradational spinners,120  young women  in medleri charkas and  60  women 3 groups  can be trained in  Amber Charkas.

The carded material can be spun by hand or on a ring spinning frame. The fineness and uniformity of the yarn spun on machine is always better than hand-spun. Generally 2–4 Nm yarn is spun on machine and around 0.5 – 1 Nm is spun by hand. The distribution of twist in the machine spun yarn is also more uniform.

The team  has collected 15 kg of camel wool samples   from the region and assigned the task of anyalsis  to  BHTTICO -Kullu  for grading  & spinning into different counts to develop sample products

 

VALUE CHAIN  IN CAMEL  WOOL BYE –PRODUCTS

 

Rajasthan  has  diversity of  crafts and crafts skills in the region in Spinning, Weaving, Tanning, Sculpting Dyeing, etc. The  communites  engaged in processing wool  and spinning are Raikas, Rebaris, Nadafs and  the  weaving  communites are Jatiyas ,  Meghwals, Kumbhars etc . The  Nadafs   are traditional   coarse fibre carders , weavers and  rope  twisters .   The  tradition and Knowledge  of  processing and  tanning of  hides   is done by  the  Soma Kasthriyas, Muslims ,   Meghawals & Schedule  castes .

The  task force team observed  that  Processing & Spinning of wool  is done locally and   for Weaving , Meghawals (Nomadic Weavers ) from  Jodhpur area  come and camp  in  Udaipur area  to weave Blankets & Kamblis  for the herders.  It takes about two days to weave a carpet and where they charge Rs. 1500. Mostly blankets/durries are woven and made in plain/stripes/checks. The Raika (mudra) make the bags (called pavaris).which essentially are used for carrying a vessel which is used for milking the camel. Some interesting handmade pouches are made for carrying tobacco and other misc. tools. The finishing of blankets (edges) is done by the Raika themselves. Milling of blankets is also practiced which is done with the help of methi and mustard oil.  Felting of kid camel hair is also done.

The task force team observed  immense potential  for gainful employment  of  rural women  in handcrafting segment because of  rich heritage of skills, techniques of crafting, traditional technologies in the region. Processing, Value- addition  of  wool  into  Spun Yarns, Twisted ropes, Felts , Tanning & processing of  hides ,  and Handcrafting  of  Came Wool  & Hide.

The interventions recommended  by the team in Value addition   are

  • FORMATION OF CAMEL HERDERS WOMENS SELF HELP GROUPS
  • Capacity Building   of  women – In  Knotting/Knitting, Weaving, Twisting, Felting, Split –Plying ,Processing Vegetable Tanning material, Leather Crafting,
  • Setting up of Pilot Training- cum – Production Centers
  • Establishing Common Facility Centers – CARDING, FELTING, TANNING

LPPS   can  promote  one SHG  group   for    2000 CAMELS –  with (15-20 women)  . there is potential for gainfully employment  of 2400 women  (220 SHG) –    In a self –help group of  20 women –   2 women  can be trained in Drop Spindle Spinning- 4 (younger women ) on Medleri Charkas,-  10 in Knotting/Knitting, Weaving, Twisting, Felting, Split –Plying ,Processing Vegetable Tanning material, Leather Crafting and  4  HAND STITCHING  – (FINAL FINISHING  ) .

LPPS can set up Pilots  of   SHGs Training cum –production – centers, in  the region  to strengthen CAMEL HERDERS SUSTAINABLE LIVLIHOOD DEVELOPMENT. It  can  partner with URMUL, who are around  Pokhran in Jaislmer who  have  good infrastructure and personnel training  in  weaving, dyeing and stitching. They are ready to collaborate if initiative is taken by  LPPS,  Similarly  they can also work  for collaboration  with Seva Mandir  in  Udaipur  region.

Camel Wool/Felt Bags production  unit  ( 20 bags/per day)

Weaving –  Fashion Accessiories  Unit  ( 10 looms)  ( 100 meters /per day)

Hide tanning  unit  (  1.5  quintals/per month)  18  quintals  per annum ( 6 persons)

Camel leather value addition  ( 30 kgs /per day -9 tons/per annum)  ( 20 women )